USING A VIRTUAL SKULL TO RECREATE SMILODON

Digital imaging came to stay a long time ago, and some times it can become a nightmare for artists with traditional training like myself. After many years painting digitally, pencil and paper are still my tools of choice when it comes to sketching, and the digital tablet and pen sometimes feel like ill-fitting gloves. And you know what they say about a cat in gloves…

That said, in many ways digital imaging has provided paleoartists with possibilities that seemed just dreams some years ago. For me, being able to handle an accurate 3D model of a fossil skull is incredibly convenient when it comes to make a faithful reconstruction of the head of an extinct animal.

In a recent book cover commission for Japanese publisher Gakken, I had to illustrate a gaping Smilodon facing the viewer, and it was imperative that the proportions were totally accurate. So I used a digital 3D model of the skull of Smilodon and rotated it in the screen until I got the right pose and angle, then I made a screen capture and used it as a template to anchor my drawing of the living head.

In this preliminary attempt the snout was too elevated and the animal’s muzzle was too compressed by perspective for my liking

So I went back to my 3D application and rotated the snout a few degrees down.

This new version was much closer to what I had in mind, so I proceeded to elaborate a line sketch

The line sketch was the basis for the final painting that appears in the book cover.

The painting was done digitally, and the flexibility of working in layers was a welcome advantage when it came to make minor adjustments to fit the requirements of the cover layout. Like it or not, most of us scientific artists are now plugged in to the digital world, so we should better look at the bright side of -virtual- things!

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Posted on 09/08/2017, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Sheila Collins

    I have yet to attempt digital artwork (beyond photography and creative editing). I feel like I was born with a pencil in my hand. I’m trying to work up the courage to try digital imaging. After all, even if my first efforts are awful, nobody else will know.

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